The Latest

Apr 9, 2014 / 116,045 notes

sisbee:

scinerds:

sixpenceee:

As someone who wants to study the human consciousness I found this very interesting.

Scott Routley was a “vegetable”. A car accident seriously injured both sides of his brain, and for 12 years, he was completely unresponsive.

Unable to speak or track people with his eyes, it seemed that Routley was unaware of his surroundings, and doctors assumed he was lost in limbo. They were wrong.

In 2012, Professor Adrian Owen decided to run tests on comatose patients like Scott Routley. Curious if some “vegetables” were actually conscious, Owen put Routley in an fMRI and told him to imagine walking through his home. Suddenly, the brain scan showed activity. Routley not only heard Owen, he was responding.

Next, the two worked out a code. Owen asked a series of “yes or no” questions, and if the answer was “yes,” Routley thought about walking around his house. If the answer was “no,” Routley thought about playing tennis.

These different actions showed activity different parts of the brain. Owen started off with easy questions like, “Is the sky blue?” However, they changed medical science when Owen asked, “Are you in pain?” and Routley answered, “No.” It was the first time a comatose patient with serious brain damage had let doctors know about his condition.

While Scott Routley is still trapped in his body, he finally has a way to reach out to the people around him. This finding has huge implications.

SOURCE

How awesome is this! :-D!!

This is really amazing but it scares me a little. How many people that have been in this state for years or even up until their passing, are conscious but trapped? 

I guess that reinforces the importance of talking to people in vegetative states, even if you think they don’t understand or aren’t there anymore to hear you. 

(via peachandchips)

Apr 9, 2014 / 6,698 notes

(via simplycasual)

Apr 9, 2014 / 86,169 notes
Apr 9, 2014 / 9,748 notes

Sophora prostrata (Kōwhai)

(via chambaron)

visitheworld:

The gothic cloister of Catedral de León, Spain (by Luciti).
Apr 9, 2014 / 4,978 notes

visitheworld:

The gothic cloister of Catedral de León, Spain (by Luciti).

(via chambaron)

nanlawsketch:

I wish Tyrion and Sansa could be a happily married couple. But it can never be.
Apr 9, 2014 / 844 notes

nanlawsketch:

I wish Tyrion and Sansa could be a happily married couple. But it can never be.

smithsonian:

A behind the scenes peek of the our Natural History Museum team packing up the #NationsTRex at Museum of the Rockies. This is the pubis bone, part of the pelvis. Follow NMNH on twitter​  for more behind the scenes pics as our new dino makes its way home. 
Apr 9, 2014 / 218 notes

smithsonian:

A behind the scenes peek of the our Natural History Museum team packing up the #NationsTRex at Museum of the Rockies. This is the pubis bone, part of the pelvis. Follow NMNH on twitter​  for more behind the scenes pics as our new dino makes its way home. 

Apr 8, 2014 / 625 notes
mstrkrftz:

 Dreamworld | Dylan Gehlken
Apr 8, 2014 / 360 notes

mstrkrftz:

Dreamworld | Dylan Gehlken

(via nepal)

Apr 8, 2014 / 136,590 notes

trebaolofarabia:

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Lost Underwater Lion City: Rediscovery of China’s ‘Atlantis

Qiandao Lake is a man-made lake located in Chun’an County, China, where archeologists have discovered in 2001 ruins of an underwater city. The city is at a depth of 26-40 meters and was named “Lion City”. There would have been 290,000 people living in this city during more than 1300 years.

What I’m impressed by is all the ornate versions of lions, then suddenly WHAM, really realistic lion.

(via orangeyoulucky)

woodendreams:

(by Lijah Hanley)
Apr 8, 2014 / 2,793 notes
Apr 8, 2014 / 173,248 notes
Apr 8, 2014 / 36,481 notes
Apr 8, 2014 / 176,067 notes
momamiaaa:

Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them!
Apr 8, 2014 / 32,847 notes

momamiaaa:

Jellyfish Lake in Palau. Apparently the jellies have lost their ability to sting because of lack of predators in the lake and you can swim with them!

(via the-narwhal-orchestra)